We exclude the operation of a fireworks display using fireworks not tested and labelled in accordance with categories 1, 2 & 3

The Categories are as follows :

  • Category 1 (“Indoor”) fireworks are for use in extremely restricted areas.
  • Category 2 (“Garden”) fireworks are for use by the public in their gardens. They must be safely viewable from 5 metres away, and must scatter no debris beyond a 3 metre range.
  • Category 3 (“Display”) fireworks are for use by the public in larger displays. They must be safely viewable from 25 metres away, and must scatter no debris beyond a 20 metre range.
  • Category 4 (“Professional”) fireworks are for sale only to fireworks professionals.

A modified vehicle is a vehicle that differs from it’s original factory standard specification for fitting of either after market parts or optional items added to it.

All vehicle modifications are material information and MUST be disclosed to your Insurer. Failure to do so may invalidate your Motor Insurance policy.

A Kit Car is an motor vehicle that is assembled from a set of parts that a manufacturer sells and the buyer then either assembles into a car themselves, or retains a third party to do part or all of the work on their behalf. Usually, many of the major mechanical systems such as the engine and transmission are sourced from donor vehicles or purchased from other suppliers.

Kits vary in completeness ranging from as little as a book of plans to a complete set with all components included.

Flat-Rated simply means that the premium is set at one level, but that premium will depend on a number of factors, including the age of the car and how powerful it is, whether it is garaged, where you live and how old you are etc…

Flat-Rated policies do not require or accumulate (earn) any no claims bonus, however if you do have a no claims bonus to use, you can normally attach the no claims bonus to one of these policies to keep the bonus ‘Live’ so it does not expire (as No Claims Bonus does expire after 2 years if not used) however a discount will not be given for the no claims bonus.

Please bear in mind though that if you do attach a no claims bonus to one of these types of policies and you do have to claim for any reason then the no claims bonus would still reduce as it would on a standard motor insurance policy.

For any motor policy, be it a car, van or motorcycle, you do not get days of grace to pay your premium.

You must pay your renewal premium on or before the renewal date otherwise all cover provided by your policy will cease, you will then be driving your vehicle uninsured and open to prosecution by the Police.

It is vital that you take notice of your renewal invitation and contact us prior to the renewal date to pay your premium or to make any changes in cover so that we can obtain a revised renewal premium for you, otherwise you will become uninsured.

If you are paying by installments via Direct Debit, then your policy may be renewed automatically, it is important that you contact us at least 10 days before the renewal date of your policy if there is any alterations as this may change your monthly payments. If you wish to lapse the policy then again please let us know prior to the renewal date of your policy as if you tell us on the day it will be too late to stop the 1st payment going through.

In any instance make sure you contact us before your renewal date, because there are no days of grace allowed by insurers.

Registering an imported vehicle

When a vehicle is imported for use in Great Britain (GB), it must be registered and taxed with the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA). This must be done as soon as possible as the vehicle can’t be used or kept on public roads.

New vehicles

A ‘brand new’ vehicle can be driven to GB and registered as ‘new’ provided the vehicle:

  • is registered within two weeks of collection – this may be extended to one calendar month at peak periods, eg before 1 March and 1 September
  • only has reasonable delivery mileage – DVLA considers reasonable delivery mileage to mean the vehicle being driven from the pick up point to home using a direct route
  • hasn’t been previously permanently registered
  • has been stored before registration and is a current model or is a model that has ceased production within the last two years

Advice to importers is to transport rather than drive vehicles from the port to the first destination.

New vehicles must have a certificate of conformity as proof of type approval from the supplier or vehicle manufacturer.

Left-hand-drive vehicles from within the European Community will need a certificate, issued by the Vehicle Certification Agency (VCA), under the Mutual Recognition scheme. This shows that changes have been made to the vehicle, making it suitable for use on British roads.

Vehicles that haven’t been subject to European type approval will be subject to one of the following tests, they are:

  • car – Individual Vehicle Approval (IVA)
  • light goods vehicle – Single Vehicle Approval (SVA) test if it is a (up to 3,000kg)
  • motorcycle or quadricycle – motorcycle SVA

You can drive your vehicle to and from the pre-arranged appointment before the vehicle is registered.

Import information pack

You can order an ‘import pack’ from the DVLA form ordering service. This provides all the necessary information and forms needed to register an imported vehicle.

Previously used vehicle

As part of the registration process DVLA must be sure that an imported used vehicle, that’s less than ten years old meets the required standards.

They are:

  • European type approval standards
  • UK construction and use
  • road vehicle lighting legislation.

Cars, motorcycles and light goods vehicles, first registered in another European Member State, must have a certificate issued by VCA under the Mutual Recognition scheme. Larger goods vehicles will need full UK type approval before they can be registered.

Cars, motorcycles and light goods vehicles first registered in a country outside of the European Union must pass the IVA, SVA or MSVA, as appropriate.

Vehicles moving between GB and Northern Ireland (NI)

Vehicles registered in NI that move to GB are no longer classed as being imported to GB. Also, vehicles registered in GB moving to NI are no longer classed as being imported to NI.

These vehicles can keep their GB or NI plates and tax disc, or they can request the registration plate to where they are going, GB or NI.

The vehicle registration certificate Northern Ireland (V5CNI) should be used to aid registration in GB and applications should be made at a DVLA local office. The vehicle registration certificate (V5C) should be used to help registration in NI. Applications should be made at The Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA), Coleraine.

Insuring your vehicle

Before you can register and tax your vehicle you’ll need to get a British insurance certificate using the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) from your vehicle.

We are able to assist with insuring your imported vehicle.

Vehicle tax

Vehicle tax will be payable in line with the vehicle’s first registration date in the UK. If the vehicle has been previously registered abroad, the date it’s first registered in the UK will determine the amount of vehicle tax that’s payable. DVLA will also allocate a vehicle registration number appropriate to the vehicle’s first registration abroad.

Registering and taxing the vehicle

You can apply for registration at your nearest DVLA local office. The application takes about a week. There is no ‘over the counter’ service.

You will need to take the following documents to the DVLA local office (photocopies or faxed copies are not acceptable):

  • completed application form V55/4 (for new vehicles) or V55/5 (for used vehicles)
  • a £55 registration fee (if applicable) and the required fee for the vehicle tax (cheques or postal orders made payable to DVLA Swansea)
  • a current British certificate of insurance
  • foreign registration document and any other papers relating to the vehicle
  • evidence showing the date the vehicle was collected (normally the invoice from the supplier)
  • evidence of type approval
  • a current British MOT test certificate (if applicable)
  • the appropriate HM Revenue and Customs form
  • a ‘Declaration that a vehicle is new’ form V267 (if applicable), available for download or from a DVLA local office
  • documentation confirming your name and address (a list of acceptable identity documentation can be found on the link below)

Registering and taxing the vehicle won’t take place unless you have the necessary documentation. In some cases the DVLA local office may wish to see the vehicle to check its identity.

Construction and Use requirements

Vehicles kept or used on the public highway in the UK must at all times comply with The Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 (as amended).

Copies of regulations aren’t available from the Department of Transport or DVLA. They can be obtained from any library or ordered from The Stationery Office Ltd (TSO).

Source: DVLA

Some Buildings insurance policies differ in the cover they provide and in their terms and conditions.

Buildings insurance policies differ in the cover they provide and in their terms and conditions. The information here is of a general nature – for detailed information you must read your policy.

Property Covered

In addition to the structure, a buildings policy covers permanent fixtures and fittings such as baths and toilets, fitted kitchens and bedroom cupboards. Interior decorations are also covered. Policies usually extend to include outbuildings such as garages, greenhouses and garden sheds. Boundary walls, fences, gates, paths, drives and swimming pools may not be covered – you need to check the policy if you need cover for these areas.

Against What Risks?

Most policies cover damage to your home by:

FireAircraft or things falling from them
LightningSubsidence, heave and landslip
ExplosionFalling trees or branches
EarthquakeImpact by vehicles or animals
TheftBreakage or collapse of aerials
Riot and malicious personsEscape of water from tanks or pipes
Storm & FloodEscape of oil from fixed heating installations

Extensions of Cover

Most buildings’ policies have valuable extensions of cover.

  • Alternative Accommodation – If your home is so badly damaged that you cannot live in it until repairs are done, your policy will help to meet the reasonable cost of alternative accommodation up to a stated limit.
  • Liability – If, as owner of your home you are responsible for any injury to someone or for damage to their property your policy will pay the damages and cost for which you are legally liable. There is usually an upper limit of £1 million or more. However, your main legal liability arises from you being occupier of your home and a contents policy covers this.
  • Underground Pipes and Cables – supplying gas, electricity, oil or water, as well as sewage pipes, are insured against accidental damage. They are not insured against wear and tear.
  • Glass – In doors, windows and skylights is covered against breakage together with baths, washbasins and WC’s.

There are limits and exceptions to every policy so make sure you have read it. It is a legal contract and if there is anything you do not understand ask for an explanation.

One word you will come across is ‘excess’. An excess is an amount of money you have to pay towards the cost of each claim.  Excesses vary in amount. They may apply only to certain types of claim or they may apply to all claims. Your policy will tell you.

One type of excess that appears in almost all policies applies to damage caused by subsidence, heave or landslip. This is usually a specific amount (for example £1,OOO). Common exclusions are war risks, damage caused by storm or flood to gates or fences, frost, sonic bangs and radioactive contamination from nuclear fuel or nuclear waste.

Be careful – Not all insurance policies are the same.

The cost of heating oil has increased significantly recently, resulting in the theft of heating oil from both domestic and commercial properties raising.

The first indication that a theft has taken place is often when the heating stops working. Usually, it’s assumed the boiler is at fault, but regrettably the problem is often that there’s no oil left. Thefts vary from small amounts being stolen to the whole tank being drained. The methods used by the thieves can be very crude, including drilling or punching holes in the side of the tank and then filling jerry cans.

What you can do to prevent losses:

  • Monitor the level of oil in your tank regularly.
  • Conceal the location of the tank by using hedging, fencing or walling.
  • Securely lock doors at all times if the tank is situated within a building.
  • Consider installing security lighting to cover the tank, if it is overlooked by nearby buildings.
  • Ask nearby residents to be vigilant and report any suspicious activity to the police.
  • Padlock the valve. This may not always be the correct course of action, as thieves may smash the valve completely, but it can deter a less determined thief.
  • Ensure any gates are locked at night, to make it more difficult for a thief to escape with oil.
  • Install an alarm device which creates an alert if the oil level suddenly drops or if the lock is attacked.
  • Consider closed circuit television.

September 2001 saw the most dramatic change to UK car registrations since 1963, when the alphabetical suffix was introduced to mark the age of a vehicle.

As of 1st September 2001 DLVA introduced not only a totally new format, but also new regulations in terms of print, size, layout and style of number plates.

New Style registration plate example

The new registration marks are made up of seven characters. There are three parts to the registration mark, each with a separate meaning.

In the example above “51” represents the 6 month period from September 2001 to February 2002.
In the”AB” shows that the vehicle was first registered in Anglia (A) at the Peterborough office (B).

  • The first two letters show where the vehicle was registered, the local memory tag.
  • The two numbers indicate the age of the vehicle, the age identifier.
  • The last three letters give a unique identity to a vehicle, the random letters.

Full List Of Local Memory Tags

From September 2001

Local Memory TagDVLA officeLocal Identifier
APeterboroughA B C D E F G H J K L M N
NorwichO P R S T U
IpswichV W X Y
BBirminghamA – Y
CCardiffA B C D E F G H J K L M N O
SwanseaP R S T U V
BangorW X Y
DChesterA B C D E F G H J K
ShrewsburyL M N O P R S T U V W X Y
EChelmsfordA – Y
FNottinghamA B C D E F G H J K L M N P
LincolnR S T V W X Y
GMaidstoneA B C D E F G H J K L M N O
BrightonP R S T U V W X Y
HBournemouthA B C D E F G H J
PortsmouthK L M N O P R S T U V W X Y
HW Reserved for the Isle of Wight
KLutonA B C D E F G H J K L
NorthamptonM N O P R S T U V W X Y
LWimbledonA B C D E F G H J
StanmoreK L M N O P R S T
SidcupU V W X Y
MManchesterA – Y
NNewcastleA B C D E G H J K L M N O
StocktonP R S T U V W X Y
OOxfordA – Y
PPrestonA B C D E F G H J K L M N O P R S T
CarlisleU V W X Y
RReadingA – Y
SGlasgowA B C D E F G H J
EdinburghK L M N O
DundeeP R S T
AberdeenU V W
InvernessX Y
VWorcesterA – Y
WExeterA B C D E F G H J
TruroK L
BristolM N O P R S T U V W X Y
YLeedsA B C D E F G H J K
SheffieldL M N O P R S T U
BeverleyV W X Y

Age Identifier

Age identifiers will continue to change twice yearly in March and September.

YearMarchSeptember
200151
20020252
20030353
20040454
20050555
2006 0656
20070757
20080858
20090959
20101060
20111161
20121262
20131363
20141464

Current Age Identifier for September 2021 is 71

To ensure that you do not lose out financially following a motor accident that was not your fault, you would have to assess your claim and prove that the other person was negligent.

These negotiations are often difficult and could be very time consuming where legal action is necessary.

How you might lose out financially:

Neither Third Party nor Comprehensive Insurance offers protection against all possible losses and even after a minor accident you could incur costs. For example, you may have to pay an excess on your policy, incur hire charges whilst your vehicle is being repaired, pay for your vehicle to be towed to a garage, or suffer loss of earnings due to injury even if the accident was not your fault.

These losses can be recovered from the person at fault, through negotiation or litigation, but why should you have to pay a solicitor to recover your losses.

What does Legal Protection cover?

Typically, your policy would probably cover you for

  • Policy excess
  • Loss of earnings
  • Car hire charges
  • Your vehicle repair costs (if third party)
  • Personal injury damages
  • Medical fees
  • Loss of use
  • Damage to personal effects
  • Vehicle recovery
  • Storage charges
  • Out of pocket expenses

You may also be able to get cover for a replacement hire car should your car be immobilised due to an accident that is not your fault.